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The Library currently holds presentations from ESCP’s conferences. Logged in members can also access the 2nd Edition of the European Manual of Medicine: Coloproctology.

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Physiology

Physiology


video Common problems in proctology: Idiopathic anal pain

By In Physiology

Symposium - Roger Robert at ESCP Dublin 2015

video The influence of obesity on postoperative outcomes following Hartmann reversal

By In Physiology

Free Paper (Miscellaneous) - Andrew Werner at ESCP Dublin 2015

video The effects of perioperative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in major gastrointestinal surgery: a multicentre, prospective cohort study

By In Physiology

Free Paper (Miscellaneous) - STARSurg Collaborative (Student Audit and Research Collaborative) at ESCP Dublin 2015

video A randomised controlled trial on the use of Coca-Cola Zero

By In Physiology

Oral Poster (Miscellaneous and Neoplasia) - Isaac Seow-En at ESCP Dublin 2015

document Physiology (Chapter 3, European Manual of Medicine: Coloproctology)

By In Physiology

The main functions of the human colon and rectum are: Transport and storage of faeces, absorption of water and electrolytes, and absorption of short-chain fatty acids. Phasic contractions of the colorectal wall are well defined, usually last a few seconds and increase intraluminal pressure. In contrast, changes in colorectal tone are less well-defined, usually last several minutes or more and they do not always increase intraluminal pressure. The most important phasic contractions are single non-propagating colonic contractions that mix colonic contents promoting absorption and antegrade pressure waves (or mass contractions) that transport colonic contents over longer distances. Various phasic rectal contraction patterns have been described, but their physiological functions need further investigation. Colorectal tone and the frequency of phasic contractions increase after a meal and decrease during sleep. Colorectal motility is controlled at the following four neural levels: The enteric nervous system within the bowel wall, the prevertebral sympathetic ganglia, parasympathetic centres within the spinal cord and the brain stem, and higher cerebral centres. The main functions of the anorectum are to maintain faecal continence and to allow defecation at an appropriate time and place. The following factors are important to maintain faecal continence: The internal anal sphincter muscle, the external anal sphincter muscle, the puborectalis muscle, rectal compliance, anorectal sensitivity, and colorectal motility.

pdf Variation in parenteral nutrition procedures: time for a unified approach?

By In Physiology

Short Paper - Mia Small (UK) at Tripartite Colorectal Meeting 2014

pdf Faecal microrna abundance analysis for the detection of colorectal pathology

By In Physiology

Short Paper - Deborah Wright (New Zealand) at Tripartite Colorectal Meeting 2014

pdf Mesocolic mesothelium displays pluripotentialism when cultured ex-vivo- implications for gastrointestinal pathologies

By In Physiology

Short Paper - Shaheel Sahebally (Ireland) at Tripartite Colorectal Meeting 2014

video Rectal hyposensitivity: clinical presentation, physiological findings and potential causative factors. A 5-year single centre experience

By In Physiology

Oral poster - Michael Feretis at ESCP Belgrade 2013

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